#RedHack, #Anonymous and #Telecomix united against Erdogan

The hacking group RedHack, in cooperation with them Anonymous, and its activists Telecomix, are trying to spread through social media ways of connecting to Twitter for all Turks wishing to connect to social network

redhack

By joint efforts, the groups seem to have set the goal of accessing the censorship imposed by the regime of Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan.

The attempts of digital censorship, joined activists and activists, who created a website to inform the public immediately. Whatever the bloc is doing, the Twitter link will always be feasible for the Turks, as the website will be updated on a daily basis with new DNS, VPNs and other alternative ways to connect.

Currently, the groups are asking the public to transmit the information on social media to spread everywhere. As they state in the short message of the website: “Transmit the information, to the universities, to the shop windows, to the doors of the houses, to the subway lines, to the restaurants, to the streets

  Snowden's statement on Barack Obama's plan

"Easy access to information is a 'human right' and we thought we would support the whole world."

On the website as mentioned above there are different ways of interconnecting in the social network, which will be constantly renewed. It is set up in a Redhackeditor account at Tumblr and messages are constantly published.

See the website

http://redhackeditor.tumblr.com/aem

It is really a very encouraging move for our fellow Turks who in 2014 years experience middle-class situations. We are confident that such measures can not be passed because the repression of an entire internet is unattainable. Public opinion monitors developments and reacts.

[tweet_embed id = 447750241992060928]

Registration in iGuRu.gr via email

Your email for sending each new post

Follow us on Google News iGuRu.gr at Google news

Leave a reply

Your email address Will not be published.

7 + 3 =  

Previous Story

The "muddy technique" and the Internet

Next Story

25 billion will cost malware hidden in pirated software